Philomena

December 16th, 2013








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Philomena

Steve Coogan at event of Philomena (2013)Still of Judi Dench and Steve Coogan in Philomena (2013)Still of Judi Dench and Steve Coogan in Philomena (2013)

Plot
A world-weary political journalist picks up the story of a woman's search for her son, who was taken away from her decades ago after she became pregnant and was forced to live in a convent.

Release Year: 2013

Rating: 7.9/10 (2,626 voted)

Director: itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/Person"

Storyline
A world-weary political journalist picks up the story of a woman's search for her son, who was taken away from her decades ago after she became pregnant and was forced to live in a convent.

Writers: ,

Taglines: These two unlikely companions are on a journey to find her long lost son.



Details

Official Website: Official site | Official site [Japan]

Country: , ,

Release Date:

Filming Locations: London, England, UK

Opening Weekend: $128,435 (USA) (22 November 2013)

Gross: $4,754,000 (USA) (29 November 2013)



Technical Specs

Runtime:



Did You Know?

Trivia:
While visiting the convent, Martin Sixsmith sees an autographed photo of an American actress on the wall and asks if it is Jayne Mansfield (it is actually Jane Russell). A character who appears later in the film, Pete Olsson, is played by Peter Hermann. Hermann is married to Jayne Mansfield's daughter, Mariska Hargitay. See more »

Goofs:
Though the film appears to be set in about 2002, the red Mazda MX-5 in which Pete Olsen arrives at his house is a third generation model, not launched until 2005. See more »



User Review

Author:

Rating: 8/10

As several critics have observed, this wonderful film, just shown at TIFF, is destined to become this year's King's Speech (which began its Oscar run in Toronto too, though Philomena has already picked up accolades in Venice). Both British films have strongly emotional undercurrents leavened by wry humour, feature outstanding performances from the leads and are based on true stories.

Judi Dench, as the Irish woman whose out-of-wedlock son is taken from her by Catholic nuns and sold to a rich American couple in the 1950's, has never been better. She imbues the role with a mix of wisdom (after all, as she reminds us repeatedly, she was nurse for 30 years) and naiveté that would seem to be impossible were it not so deftly handled. While the cynical atheist portrayed by Steve Coogan rarely misses an opportunity to poke fun at her, more often than not she enjoys the last laugh.

Despite the consummate acting, and Frears' slick directing, the greatest treat of the film is Steve Coogan's screenplay. Given its subject matter, the story could easily have veered into melodrama, but just when it is on the verge of doing so Coogan pulls us back from the edge. Thankfully, Coogan himself is there to convey precisely the proper blend of sarcasm and compassion.




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